Most people access the Fediverse through one of the large instances: lemmy.world, kbin, or beehaw. New or small instances of Lemmy have no content by default, and can most easily get content by linking to larger Lemmy instances. This is done manually one “Community” at a time (I spent 15 minutes doing this yesterday). Meanwhile, on larger instances, content naturally aggregates as a result of the sheer number of users. Because people generally want a user experience similar to Reddit, I think it’s inevitable that most user activity will be concentrated in one or two instances. It is probable that these instances follow in the footsteps of Reddit- the cycle repeats.

I actually think the Fediverse is in the beginning the process of fragmenting into siloed smaller, centralized instances. Beehaw, which is on the list of top instances, just blacklisted everyone from lemmy.world. Each of the three largest instances now are working to be a standalone replacement for Reddit and are in direct competition with each other. It is possible that this fragmentation and instability? of Lemmy instances will kill the viability of Federated Reddit altogether, but hopefully not.

These are my main takeaways from my three days on the Fediverse. I will stick around to see if the Fediverse can sustain itself after the end of the Reddit blackouts.

  • @towerful@beehaw.org
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    621 year ago

    It sounds like you are describing new user experience.
    And I understand, coming from Reddit, how this can be a shock.
    However, that’s how Lemmy works.
    Similar to how twitter users got a shock moving (or trying to move) to mastadon.

    The very nature of the fediverse works better with more instances, where a single instance has fewer users and the communities are more focussed.

    Beehaw hasn’t “blacklisted everyone from…”. They’ve defederated. Whilst it may seem similar, it’s more nuanced. And that’s what a lot of people don’t understand.
    Block-listing all users from lemmy.world from interacting with beehaw would be an amazing ability. That would put beehaw in a read-only state for users on lemmy.world, whilst still allowing beehaw users access to lemmy.world.
    Unfortunately, the current admin/mod tools do not allow for that. And manually dealing with the huge influx of toxic users (posting death threats, illegal porn or trolling) was taking too much time.

    Besides, the lemmy.world admin is working on custom tooling to deal with this issue. Because it is their users causing this issue, and it is their problem. And there is no higher authority - there are no Reddit admins to say “stop brigading”.
    Shitjustworks, last I heard, weren’t responding to communication.
    I have no doubts that beehaw will refederate as soon as Lemmy.world sorts their mod issues, or the Lemmy framework allows for more nuanced mod tools.

    You have to remember that Lemmy is young.
    It’s been around for a few years, but the shear scale of what is happening now is less than 2 weeks old

    • @JohannesOliver@beehaw.org
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      121 year ago

      It’s unfortunate if the sh.itjust.works folks aren’t speaking, their listed rules seem pretty reasonable and the problem users appear to be breaking the rules of that instance too.

      • Lionir [he/him]
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        151 year ago

        We have talked with them and will work with other instances to push for better moderation tool. We have nothing against individual people or their communities. Let’s keep that in mind.

        • FaceDeer
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          11 year ago

          This copy-and-pasted reply doesn’t actually address what I was talking about.

          The people who have a problem here aren’t lemmy.world, it’s beehaw. So while it’s understandably polite for lemmy.world to moderate themselves, ultimately the tools you’re going to need will be on beehaw’s side, because even if lemmy.world does everything you could possibly desire there’s going to be many other instances that allow open subscription in the future and you can’t expect them all to do your policing for you.

          • Lionir [he/him]
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            91 year ago

            This message was not copy-pasted nor was it addressed to you, I’m kinda confused why you think that.

            But yes, beehaw needs moderations tools - we are working with other instances so that Lemmy - for everyone - can have better tools.

            Also, we don’t expect other instances to do policing for us, this is why we want better federation options so that people using Beehaw can interact with the outside but those that do not cultivate a culture that matches with what we want would not be able to interact on Beehaw.

            • FaceDeer
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              1 year ago

              Very weird, there appears to be a bug in kbin. I’m seeing your “We have talked with them…” comment as a response to dozens of different comments here, including one that I made, and now when I look through the thread my response to your comment is replicated in all those dozens of places as well. My apologies, that would explain why your response seemed like such a non-sequitur to me. I’ll see if I can file a bug report about this.

              Edit: here’s the bug report.

              Edit 2: I missed a duplicate bug report that was already filed for this issue

              • Lionir [he/him]
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                21 year ago

                Thank you for filing the bug report - that is really weird… I hope kbin fixes that issue quickly because that’s definitely gonna lead to some very off interpretations.

    • FaceDeer
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      61 year ago

      Block-listing all users from lemmy.world from interacting with beehaw would be an amazing ability. That would put beehaw in a read-only state for users on lemmy.world, whilst still allowing beehaw users access to lemmy.world. Unfortunately, the current admin/mod tools do not allow for that.

      Besides, the lemmy.world admin is working on custom tooling to deal with this issue. Because it is their users causing this issue, and it is their problem.

      It seems to me that calling this “lemmy.world’s problem” and expecting them to be the ones to solve it is disingenuous. You yourself say that you could “solve” it with your own custom tooling. Why not work on adding the ability to block users from a specific other instance on your instance, if that would be an amazing ability? Why is it only lemmy.world that has to do work to solve the problem?

      Other instances also allow open signups, and there will no doubt be more of them in the future.

      • @Elw@lemmy.sdf.org
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        21 year ago

        I think what they’re trying to say here is that lemmy.world is a site with a community and they’ve got a problem of having a toxic community that’s abusing another community. THAT is their problem and they need to fix it through moderation. Until then, other communities will do what they need to do to limit the damage caused by the users of their community. It’s not solely up to Lemmy.world to create the tools to fix their issue but it is their responsibility to moderate effectively, just like every other community has that responsibility and they have an incentive to work on the tools to make that job easier for themselves but also for all of the communities in the fediverse.

    • @JeknilahOP
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      61 year ago

      You misunderstand. I was making the case that for me personally, the fediverse works better if there are few central node instances that are not particularly focused. I get that this is controversial, but I make the case for it anyways.

      For example, I would rather have all the largest technology, gaming, and selfhosting communities be in one or two instances rather than having to x-post to 5 technology or gaming communities across numerous instances.

      The second part is only speculation, but I thought it was worth mentioning anyways.

      • M. Orange
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        121 year ago

        I mean… that’s on you, then. Historically, that’s not how the Fediverse has worked, and it likely will continue to not work that way. Things could always change, considering the Twitter exodus and now the Reddit exodus, but the way most Fediverse services are set up seems to encourage smaller communities rather than large, centralized ones. Plus, if you have centralized ones, what happens if admins go rogue? What if the servers go down? What if, what if, what if? With decentralization, you avoid so many issues that come with having those large, centralized instances. Of course, there are downsides, but if you want something centralized, maybe try something like Tildes?

        • @JeknilahOP
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          21 year ago

          Twitter is a extremely good fit for ActivityPub as there you are following users, while in Lemmy you primarily follow communities whose strength is determined by number. !technology on beehaw is better than !technology on an instance of 10 people.

          By centralized, I mean to be in the 1-4 large instances on Lemmy that people flock to from smaller instances. Right now, the design of the Fediverse encourages former Redditors to join the biggest instances. Discovery tools might spread out the users and make solo instances more viable, but the activity may still be concentrated in the same few instances.

          Every instance has the potential to be standalone like Tildes by defederating from everybody else once they hit critical mass. Like Truth Social on Mastodon. Or Kbin before it Federated.

          • czech
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            101 year ago

            I think we just need better discovery and aggregation. If everyone is looking at an aggregation of “/technology” from every federated instance then there’s no reason to flock to large instances.

          • @phase_change@beehaw.org
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            31 year ago

            Isn’t there a big danger of advertising and influence moving in if you have a handful of centralized servers?

            Sock puppet accounts to influence the conversation don’t make economic sense when the people you are influencing number in the thousands. They do when you are in the millions.

            Paying a server admin for influence or a hand on the scale makes no sense if that server has thousands of users mostly subscribed to your handful of communities on your handful of large instances.

            Yes, the user experience is easier, but I think it opens things up to community attack scenarios that a wider federation of of servers with a wide distribution of popular communities makes more difficult.

            And to be clear, I don’t mean attack as in taking systems offline. I mean attack as in moneyed interests doing the type of thing moneyed interest does on all popular social media. Things that I believe make the user experience worse.

            My fear is that your desire for centralization to make the user experience easier creates a system that makes the user experience worse in a way that makes it much more difficult to fight.

        • @JohannesOliver@beehaw.org
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          11 year ago

          What fediverse services are set up that way? For most projects, the flagship instance is by far the largest. For Mastodon it is something like 900k difference between the next most popular instance.

  • dudeami0
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    391 year ago

    There seems to be a lot of FUD going around with the defederation news. The problem, as most problems seem to currently be, is the population is exploding and the tooling isn’t there to support the real growth in numbers. Beehaw has been a community for quite a while, and they were just here first so have more established communities, you can’t blame them for that. They have every right to defederate instances, especially when their main concern is being able to moderate content for their users. Each instance serves their users first, other instances lack of user moderation shouldn’t be their problem. They said they’ll open back up once they can manage the moderation work load.

    As for the fragmentation, this is really how lemmy was designed to be. There is talks of adding federated community listings and community browsers to lemmy itself to support discovery. Really, these features just weren’t needed a couple weeks ago and now they are. In my opinion, the larger communities should have communities on multiple instances. You can cross-post across instance communities as well. Hopefully in the future the fragmentation can be fixed via the use of tags and other possible organizational tools that help federation but keeps things decentralized.

    The established instances have dominance due to the first-mover advantage, which is causing the centralization at present. Overall, the experience is going to be different to a lot of reddit users due to the very nature of decentralizing things. I feel confident solutions will be found for most of these issues, and make the federated experience easier to navigate while still supporting the decentralized nature. But the fact is, this isn’t and never will be "reddit’ as it was, which was a centralized system with a single authority (the ToS and admins).

    • @yuun@lemmy.one
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      1 year ago

      Absolutely. I don’t think it’s really sunk in generally that the Fediverse is intended to operate fundamentally differently from a centralized system. An instance selectively (de)federating is how it’s supposed to work.

      If the platform running as intended kills it, then there are big problems. I don’t think it will, but the user culture does have to change and incorporate knowledge of how the system works. We need to not have threads saying the Fediverse, a platform built on decentralization, needs to centralize as much as possible to survive.

      • @phase_change@beehaw.org
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        121 year ago

        Yep. Threads like this boil down to “Lemmy isn’t the perfect Reddit replacement I want. We need to change things so it will be as close to Reddit as possible.”

        Look, I migrated to Reddit from Digg. Reddit wasn’t exactly like Digg. I actually found it nicer. A new user on Reddit a month ago would not have had the same experience I had a decade ago. The default subreddits are different. The types of posts are different. The popular posts are different. The comment sections are very different.

        I’ve stayed on Reddit until the kerfuffle, but I doubt I’d ever decide to join if I first found it as a new user today.

        The de-federation that beehaw just put in place listed, in part, the desire to keep the comment sections from devolving into current Reddit comment sections. And, as many others have pointed out, it was a reluctant move because of a limit of moderation resources and tools.

        I joined the fediverse last week as one of many Reddit refugees. I joined sh.itjust.works because at the time it was a smaller instance and the large ones were overloaded. The de-federation didn’t make me happy, largely for the selfish reason that the more interesting communities I was subscribed to were on beehaw.

        The goal of the de-federation did make me happy. I want quality content and engaged and engaging comments. I subscribed here, but also kept my sh.itjust.works account.

        I’m not particularly concerned about a split acccount history. I have hopes that Lemmy and the fediverse will make it successfully through the growing pains this unexpected influx of new users will cause. I’m certain this isn’t going to be the only growing pain event, nor do I think it will be the most painful.

        • @kool_newt@beehaw.org
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          31 year ago

          I think the way Lemmy federation works is kinda perfect and I feel like things will mostly sort themselves out after a while. Like, I can foresee large and small islands of federated servers, and while that might not seem good at first, I think it can work.

          For example, I might have two Fediverse users, one I use in the “mainstream” island, and another I use in not-mainstream servers that has more controversial topics. A kid might have a user in a kids appropriate island where there is no federation with servers containing adult content.

          Maybe a Lemmy client can then combine content from my two users, so I can view content from the mainstream and my alt servers together.

  • @Uniquitous@lemmy.one
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    371 year ago

    Hard disagree. Centralization is what enables rich dickheads to seize control of what ought to be the commons. Dispersing the community into many small nodes that communicate with each other is the safeguard against that happening. Ideally it shouldn’t matter which node you call home.

    • ATGM 🚀
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      61 year ago

      Exactly. Reddit was dominated by small groups of controlling mods.

      Decentralization means freedom to try something better.

    • @gun@lemmy.ml
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      41 year ago

      OP is not saying centralization is good, just that it appears to be inevitable even on the fediverse. They suggested this centralization could kill the project altogether. You misread their point.

      Smh people downvoting OP because they can’t read.

      • @Uniquitous@lemmy.one
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        21 year ago

        Also, the title of the post is “the lemmy experience is better when centralized” so maybe if you’re gonna call out reading comprehension, try a little of it yourself. Smh indeed.

        • @gun@lemmy.ml
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          11 year ago

          Well maybe if you read past the title you would be following the conversation better

          • @Uniquitous@lemmy.one
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            11 year ago

            So the title and the content of the post are inconsistent, and you’re gonna put that on me? Cool cool cool.

    • @boff@lemmy.one
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      31 year ago

      That’s definitely an ideal benefit of decentralization, but as the OP correctly pointed out, the reality often works out differently than the ideal.

    • @LoreleiSankTheShip@lemmy.ml
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      21 year ago

      Exactly! I believe that once Rexxit is over, a big part of those that stay and have joined the big instances will naturally migrate to smaller instances with rules and philosophies that match their own.

  • @MyFeetOwnMySoul@lemmy.ca
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    331 year ago

    I think the issue that beehaw had was one of insufficient moderation tooling. Very solvable, and the admins even say that, but they also said they can’t stand around waiting for mod tools to become available, so they’re using the tool they have for the time being. If Lemmy catches on, I’m sure these issues will be solved in due time.

    • nii236
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      101 year ago

      Beehaw is big on the “safe space” approach, rather than “grow” approach. So makes sense they did what they did.

      • @VentraSqwal@links.dartboard.social
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        51 year ago

        In their defense, I remember a lot of people bouncing off voat specifically because it was full of trolls, racists, and generally horrible people. We don’t want that happening here, too.

        • nii236
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          Its a fine line between “safe space” and “too space so no content”. I think Beehaw has managed to achieve that

    • @eutsgueden@lemm.ee
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      91 year ago

      Exactly. They recognize that defederation is the nuclear option, but it’s the only effective tool they have at the moment.

    • @flashgnash@lemm.ee
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      1 year ago

      What moderation tooling do they need? Never did any Reddit modding myself but might be down for making some tools if someone gave me a rundown of what’s needed

      • @MyFeetOwnMySoul@lemmy.ca
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        21 year ago

        Unfortunately, I’m not really equipped to answer your question, but in sure if you reached out to behaws admins they’d point you in the right direction

      • abclop99
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        21 year ago

        Anything besides manually checking each post/comment and defederating an entire instance would help.

  • @Mummelpuffin@beehaw.org
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    281 year ago

    Gross blech gross yuck. No, please god no. I’m subscribed to communities from loads of instances. The whole point of federated applications is that no one really has control over the whole.

    • @StringTheory@beehaw.org
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      171 year ago

      People who have been engaged in an authoritarian system for so long that they “can’t see the forest for the trees” are lost when they experience anything else. They are driven to recreate the centralized authority, because it is life as they know it.

  • @StringTheory@beehaw.org
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    281 year ago

    Each of the three largest instances now are working to be a standalone replacement for Reddit

    Beehaw has been it’s own thing for a couple years now. It has never wanted to be Reddit. They have done such a good job of curating their instance with excellent communities and membership that the Rexxitors want to join it and make it into THEIR replacement for Reddit.

  • rs5th
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    261 year ago

    Each of the three largest instances now are working to be a standalone replacement for Reddit and are in direct competition with each other.

    I think it’s clear Beehaw isn’t working to be, or wanting to be, a replacement for Reddit at all.

    • @yuun@lemmy.one
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      151 year ago

      There seems to be quite a few folks here that basically want the Lemmyverse to be Reddit with new management

      • @Spzi@lemmy.click
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        31 year ago

        That’s fine, they can try? Just as anyone else can have different goals and pursue them.

        I really like this openness of the fediverse in arguments like these. We don’t have to agree, it’s alright.

    • @JeknilahOP
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      51 year ago

      This commentary wasn’t particularly targeted at beehaw. I was just saying that I don’t see the appeal of generalized mega-instances going away.

      • Gil (he/they)
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        71 year ago

        You did post this on the biggest community on Beehaw after all, haha. It’s to be expected that some people will think you’re talking about us.

      • rs5th
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        51 year ago

        Fair. Discovery is easier on a big instance, but you get a lot more control on a smaller one.

  • @Floppy@beehaw.org
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    241 year ago

    This is exactly what happened with the early waves of mastodon migration; a whole load of instances suddenly had to up their game, there was defederation all over, and tooling had to improve to handle mod needs in larger communities. We’ll get there, it’ll stabilise. In the meantime, fund your server and thank your mods :)

  • @luciole@beehaw.org
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    221 year ago

    I don’t want an experience similar to Reddit though. I want a small active community with shared values and a variety of subjects.

    • @veaviticus@lemmy.one
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      1 year ago

      Idk. I’m conflicted on this. While I agree… For bigger/broader topics, I can definitely see that the quality of discussion and the repetition of topic is already really bad for smaller/niche communities.

      When the subreddit had maybe 2k subs worldwide, and now is comprised of 50 subs spread across 3 instances… It’s rough. That community is just dead and that sucks.

      I guess I’d rather have one centralized community on one big (yet open source) instance where I know we can leave and move again, than have the community just die entirely

  • @mim@lemmy.sdf.org
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    1 year ago

    And this is why I didn’t sign up for a large instance.

    I’d rather join a smaller one that doesn’t block any instance, neither is it blocked by other instances.

    I just want to slowly find new communites and join the ones I think have good discussion, regardless of where they are hosted. I don’t need babysitting.

    • Powderhorn
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      141 year ago

      Spinning up your own solves all these issues. That’s not for everyone, myself included thus far, but ultimately, no one is going to build, maintain and host exactly what I want for free forever. That’s an unreasonable expectation in any context.

      • @mim@lemmy.sdf.org
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        11 year ago

        That’s true.

        I’m not that invested into Lemmy yet. But if I end up using it as much as reddit, I might do this (sounds like an interesting project anyway).

        For now, I’ll keep my account in a smaller / more open instance.

        If anything, I think reddit was a good lesson on what happens when you let a small group of people control such a large platform. We might run into the same issues if we get a couple of instances get too large.

        • Powderhorn
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          21 year ago

          The first sentence of your last graf makes “might” do some really heavy lifting in the second.

          I think we’ll see a full spectrum of how people use Lemmy, and I suspect in the long run, self-selection on each instance is going to make federation make a far more understandable concept to people with any curiosity about it, and if everyone else wants Reddit, hey, more power to them.

  • @BravoVictor@programming.dev
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    181 year ago

    I’m really diggin’ it. I was just looking through the list of subs that Lemmy has on their site and found programming.dev. Asked to join, and zero reason to go elsewhere. I can subscribe to damn near anything easily, and my instance has a pretty chill main section(not sure what you call it). Programming focused, but plenty of cat picks, wild bird pictures, random memes…

    I think I’m sticking around for a while.

  • @SpaceCowboy639@beehaw.org
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    171 year ago

    This kind of stuff follows Zipf’s Law so it’s 100% expected that there will be 3-4 instances aggregating the largest amounts of traffic, but instances smaller than that will constantly shift around and grow, organically, rather than be compounded and corralled artificially by one platform. In other words, this is just statistics playing out and we’re nowhere near the end.

  • anji
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    171 year ago

    Beehaw only defederated from Lemmy.world because of the currently limited moderation tools in the software. This is not going to be a problem forever.

    I hope people can find communities both on large instances (Beehaw, Lemmy.world) as well on as very small niche instances. Discoverability is a bit a problem but I think over time we will find communities we like, and participate in them. What instance they are hosted on is not all that important.

    • MadCybertist
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      41 year ago

      I’m on kbin and I have to say I like what they are doing better than Lemmy as far as ease of use and UI. It will be interesting to see how this all shakes out.

      • tox_solid
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        31 year ago

        I agree. I have both lemmy and kbin accounts, and so far I think the new user experience on kbin is just a little bit easier. But I’ll keep my eye on lemmy in the meantime. You’re right, it will be very interesting to see how this thing develops.

        • ethane
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          41 year ago

          The best chance of succeeding is federation across both. The user base on both is already small, there’s no need for this us-vs-them mentality.

  • AtomHeartFather
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    Hot take. I think the instances that are trying to be Reddit are the ones that give their users carte blanche to create new communities without any thought of looking to see if the same community exists elsewhere. I’d prefer that community creation be limited to the admins of each instance, that way they could - hopefully - at least do a cursory search to see if the community exists already and then just add it to THEIR instances subscriptions. There’s a reason why every community shouldn’t be on a single instance. It’s a single point of failure.

    • Scrubbles
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      Very frustrating for sure, I feel like I’m constantly playing ping pong with new users.

      New user doesn’t understand lemmy and searches for community on service like lemmy.ml. Community doesn’t exist so the spam the “Create Community” button or spam the admin for it. Admin is overworked/doesn’t know/busy building the site and says “okay”, meanwhile there is already a community of 100+ members on another instance.

      For me, I built my instance to take some weight off of the main instances, thought “hey here’s a group of communities that are pretty close knit that don’t need to put pressure on the already overloaded servers”, and I still get people who are posting “I made ____ community on lemmy.ml come join!” and it’s like dude, ffs.

      For example, I run an instance that focuses on a genre of music. Thus, I’m pretty dang open to anything even remotely open to that.

      • If it doesn’t exist seriously you could have made it on my instance and modded it, give the central servers a break. I’m all for spreading the love but seriously, don’t just make it by default on the popular instances
      • If it does exist, ffs just look around. At this point most communities on Reddit have something analogous here, or ther’es something similar you could post in first asking if there is one. “If /c/cyberpunk2077 doesn’t exist maybe ask /c/gaming first. (and yes, cyberpunk2077 does exist)”.
      • This is separate from if you don’t like a community and you want to truly create your own. That’s great, you should feel empowered to do so, but don’t just spam the “Create Community” option if you haven’t even tried to see if it’s out there yet. At the very least, search out some instances and figure out where your best home should be. At this point it probably isn’t lemmy.ml or beehaw.org.

      That turned a bit more ranty than I expected.

      • AtomHeartFather
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        Community discovery that spans all federated instances should be one of the top things that development should be working on. And it should be integrated into Lemmy, not as a separate website people have to go to and search.

        Peoples are lazy. They don’t want to have to go to some separate website and then search for something. And lets not even get started on the difficulties of adding a remote community if your instance doesn’t know it exists, its wonky at best.

        If a user cant type “Stephen King community” in the search bar on their instance and then get results, they are either going to assume it doesn’t exist and give up OR they are going to be hitting that “Create Community” button.

        • Scrubbles
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          51 year ago

          For sure, as much as I want users to be smarter… well my experience in development tells me they never will be. I literally had one user ping me on Lemmy asking how to join, I gave them pictures detailing steps. They were on mobile and gave up because “The subscribe button was in the sidebar and it was too confusing”

          That’s what we’re up against. The extra button click was too much for some users.

          Lemmy has to get more user friendly when it comes to subscribing. You’re absolutely right it needs to be one search and click “subscribe”. They should bring the feddit browser into lemmy really.

          • @Taxxor@feddit.de
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            1 year ago

            I feel you. When creating an UI you can think of thousands of possibilities which might not be clear to someone and design it in a way that couldn’t possibly be misunderstood, then show it to different people who all agree that it’s clearly structured and logical… and the minute you release it you get posts from users you aks yourself how they could even exist on their own.

    • @towerful@beehaw.org
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      71 year ago

      That’s not a hot take.
      That’s where I think the threadiverse/lemmyverse/fediverse/whatever is (hopefully) going to end up.
      The big instances are like browsing /r/all. The focused instances are going to be where it’s at.

      “Oh, rust? Yeh, you want the rust instance, or maybe the programming instance. Not here in the gardening instance”

      • supernovae
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        21 year ago

        Different paradigms for different tools. I think niche on mastodon and calckey is meh - people need agency. Niche on kbin seems fine because people have agency regardless of server they’re on.

      • Powderhorn
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        21 year ago

        The focused instances are going to be where it’s at.

        And far easier to moderate. You could have 1,800 communities on the Rust instance and still know content anywhere should be about Rust or Rust-adjacent.

    • db0
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      31 year ago

      Counterpoint, allowing people to create their own communities is how new ideas for communities come up. If it wasn’t for that freedom, people wouldn’t have come up with ama, meirl and all the other weird concepts that took off

      • AtomHeartFather
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        11 year ago

        I’m not saying you shouldn’t be allowed to create a new community. I’m saying that due diligence should be taken BEFORE creating a new community, to be sure that community doesn’t already exist.

        • AnonymousLlama
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          11 year ago

          I’d say for the majority of people who are coming here from Reddit, the concept of federated servers and looking for duplicates would be a pain. I think most people who come to a site like kbin search to see if there’s a local community and if not would want to create it.

          Admins I’d assume would be able to search connected other sites to see if a community exists elsewhere, but that sounds like it puts more work on them when they’re busy with PRs and infrastructure work.

          I’ve got no idea about what the best approach is, but it needs to be somewhat simple it we want people to join and stick around I feel.

        • db0
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          11 year ago

          Mental bandwidth. By adding the requirement of a mod approval before creating a new community will cause most people to not bother at all.

          • @cstine@lemmy.uncomfortable.business
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            51 year ago

            As a counterpoint to that: any new community that gets created on an instance is now a possible liability the site admins have to own.

            Makes a lot of sense that you wouldn’t want anyone to make anything on your site, since that’s how you end up with /r/jailbait, and /r/fatpeoplehate and so on.

            Seems reasonable you’d want to make sure you understand who is creating what and why on a platform you’re ultimately responsible for.

            • db0
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              11 year ago

              It’s really not difficult to delete a unwanted community. The cost benefit analysis I think still leans towards open for all, as a breakaway success story makes up for it.

              • @cstine@lemmy.uncomfortable.business
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                21 year ago

                It’s not just the difficulty, it’s that the fediverse runs on reputation.

                If you get a reputation for being an instance that has offensive/illegal content, you’ll get defederated and your users will get a materially worse experience than the rest of the instances that are federating with each other - and it really only takes one or two things to get that reputation.

                sh.itjust.works is a prime example: it didn’t take an awful lot to get them down the defederation road, and I suspect most admins would want to maintain their reputation and an easy way to do it (until we get like… moderation tools) is to just gatekeep what communities show up on your instance.

                • db0
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                  31 year ago

                  Actually that problem is usually registered users going into established communities of otherwise instances and trolling, not new communities pooping up that nobody knows about.

    • @vikinghoarder@infosec.pub
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      21 year ago

      although having the same community in different servers might serve a purpose as well, I try to subscribe to the “same” community in different servers, this way you don’t have centralization since if one goes down, the others are still up, and you can post to whatever server and interested people will see the post (assuming everyone does the same).

    • @notfromhere@lemmy.one
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      21 year ago

      I would rather a lemmy instance only supported a single community. That would force the horizontal scaling better

      • roboTRASH
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        71 year ago

        That would be extremely wasteful in a resource sense. You would need more overhead, more domains, more everything to support that.

    • @JeknilahOP
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      21 year ago

      Yeah, I do like throwing hot takes out there. XD But I do think that you are asking a lot when you ask people to limit the scope of their instance.

      It will always be easier to just add another community under a larger instance than to go out and self-host your own niche from scratch. There’s certainly a temptation for an instance to go mega and general-purpose.

      I’m not disagreeing that a single instance is a point of failure- just that people are willing to make that trade-off.

      • AtomHeartFather
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        1 year ago

        I was never insinuating that an instance owner should limit their scope. But just because you run an instance doesn’t mean you have to be the home node for all the communities you are interested in. It goes against the idea of federation. If a community already exists on another instance, as an instance owner you should subscribe to that community rather than making your own. That increases resilience.

        • @Spzi@lemmy.click
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          11 year ago

          If a community already exists on another instance, as an instance owner you should subscribe to that community rather than making your own. That increases resilience.

          How does that increase resilience? I would say the opposite increases resilience, multiple communities for the same topic on different instances. Putting all your eggs in one basket is not resilient, it puts everyone on the whim of the admins of that instance.

        • @JeknilahOP
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          11 year ago

          Interesting. Do you think there will be steps to make communities more focused? Like a hypothetical deal where lemmyworld will give up “gaming” if kbin gives up “technology”?

          • AtomHeartFather
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            1 year ago

            Honestly, I hope not.

            For example, if all the “programming” communities ended up on a single instance, that is still a single point of failure. I think it would be better if they were spread out a bit. That way if the programming themed instance went down unexpectedly it wouldn’t take ALL the programming communities out with it, only the ones it hosts.

            There’s nothing stopping anyone from creating a programming themed instance and then subscribing to various programming communities on other instances and then creating their own local communities to fill in the gaps. And ideally, I think that’s what should happen.

            • @JeknilahOP
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              11 year ago

              I’m often wrong, but I have a hunch that it will be necessary if the goal is to avoid centralization. I do think it would be sensible to limit the broadest communities (politics, tech, gaming) to two central “node” instances; very curious to see if it will get to that point.

    • MadCybertist
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      11 year ago

      This is why Squabbles and Tildes will probably do well in the end. They are much more strict on allowing people in at the start, MUCH easier entry and just simpler to understand overall.

      • ethane
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        21 year ago

        But any site which restricts sign ups is going to turn off 50% of the people who show up.

        • Markoff
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          11 year ago

          Squabbles has unrestricted sign up, but from what I see it’s becoming Reddit very fast, just same intolerant hivemind already calling for downvotes so they can downvote inconvenient opinions despite they are presented in civil way and don’t break rules, so might as well stay on Reddit for same experience

  • HTTP_404_NotFound
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    161 year ago

    I would disagree.

    What happens when everyone flocks to beehaw, or lemmy.world- Is those instances end up going pretty slowly.

    People from other instances can still read, can still post, and can comment. This, for example, is popping up on my newsfeed.

    A post, on beehaw, written by a user on monero.town, being read by a user on lemmyworld.com.

    Also, when beehaw defederated with lemmy.world, that is no bueno too.